Spring 2019 Public Science Project Book Series Events!

These events include:

2/13
None of the Above: The Untold Story of the Atlanta Public Schools Cheating Scandal, Corporate Greed, and the Criminalization of Educators
Shani Robinson and Anna Simonton
6-8 PM (Room 4202)

2/27
New York After 9/11
Editors: Susan Opotow and Zachary Baron Shemtob with contributors Diala Shamas and Charles Jennings6-8 PM (Room 6304.01)

3/04
Psycurity: Colonialism, Paranoia, and the War on Imagination
Rachal Liebert with Sonia Sanchez and Donald Brown
5-7 PM (Room 6304.01)

3/11 Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Trans and Were Afraid to Ask
Brynn Tannhill with Tanya Domi
5-7 PM (Room C198)

5/23 Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education
Michelle Fine (EP Faculty Member), Marc Spooner, Joel Westheimer, Sandy Grande
6-8 PM (Room 6304.01

FACULTY BOOK: SUSAN OPOTOW

New York After 9/11

(Empire State Editions, 2018)

Edited by Susan Opotow and Zachary Baron Shemtob

Contributor(s): Michael Arad, Michael Crane, Brian Davis, Ariel Durosky, Kimberly Flynn, Norman Groner, Lait Helpman, Anne Hilburn, Daniel Libeskind, Charles Jennings, Ari Lowell, Roberto Lucchini, Guillermina Mejia, Hirofumi Minami, Jacqueline Moline, Yuval Neria, Cristina Onea, Susan Opotow, David Prezant, Karyna Pryiomka, Joan Reibman, Diala Shamas, Zachary Baron Shemtob, Micki Siegel de Hernández, Patrick Sweeney and Xi Zhu

An estimated 2 billion people around the world watched the catastrophic destruction of the World Trade Center. The enormity of the moment was immediately understood and quickly took on global proportions. What has been less obvious is the effect on the locus of the attacks, New York City, not as a seat of political or economic power, but as a community; not in the days and weeks afterward, but over months and years. New York after 9/11 offers insightful and critical observations about the processes set in motion by September 11, 2001 in New York, and holds important lessons for the future.

Power, Collective Struggle, and the Poetic Imagination

Mon, Oct 1, 2018, 06:30 PM – 08:30 PM
The Skylight Room (9100)

Join us for the launch of three timely books, Building Power From Below: Chilean Workers Take on Walmart by Carolina Bank Muñoz, Curated Stories: The Uses and Misuses of Storytelling by Sujatha Fernandes, and Landia by Celina Su, that look at the joy and poetry of collective struggles. Panning through the voices of Chilean Walmart workers, Afghan women writers, West Indian domestic workers in New York, and Burmese refugee children in northwestern Thailand, these books explore what it means to tell one’s story, the value and peril of symbolic power, and the poetry at the heart of social struggles in the contemporary world. Authors will discuss themes from their books, followed by a Q & A with the audience.

Co-sponsored by Advanced Research Collaborative (ARC); the Center for Place, Culture and Politics; the PhD Program in Sociology; Gittell Urban Studies Collective; and the Center for the Humanities at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

More info here

2018 CUNY Adjunct Incubator Project

The Center for the Humanities’ CUNY Adjunct Incubator, co-sponsored by the Gittell Urban Studies Collective, is a framework for supporting the significant scholarly, creative, and pedagogical work of adjuncts teaching in the humanities and humanistic social sciences across CUNY. Providing social, logistical, financial, and professional support for the production and circulation of knowledge by CUNY adjuncts, this platform promotes the crucial work of part-time faculty across CUNY community and senior college campuses.

Learn more about the program here.

CUNY Adjunct Grant-Funded Projects & Scholarship 

In 2018, the CUNY Adjunct Incubator awarded grants to 13 CUNY adjuncts from 6 CUNY colleges to develop a wide-range of deeply impactful public and applied projects in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. These projects range from addressing the needs and amplifying the successes of CUNY student-parents, to writing and performing new musical compositions for 3D-printed instruments, to photo-documentation of the erasure of Kurdish language from Kurdistan/Turkey, to food provision mapping that elucidates eating habits, access, and food inequities, and many more projects taking the form of concerts, dance, music, workshops, books, film, performance, classes, independent scholarship, and events. Read more about these grant-funded projects and the vital research and work by these outstanding CUNY adjuncts:

Continue reading

THE LONG VIEW FILM SCREENING AND TALK

The Long View chronicles the efforts of Oakland’s students, educators, organizers, parents, and community members to create lasting solutions to the systemic inequities in the city’s public school system. The film unfolds over the course of a three-year community effort to come together and create change in schools and in the district as a whole.

6:30 pm refreshments in Room 4202
7:00-9:00 film screening Martin Segal Theater

Remarks following the film by Zakiyah Ansari, Advocacy Director,
New York State Alliance for Quality Education (AQE)
and conversation with film’s director

Co-sponsored by the Ph.D. Programs in Urban Education, Critical Psychology,
the Public Science Project, the URBAN Research Network,
the Center for Advanced Study in Education and the Gittell Collective
Foundation support from:
The Stuart Foundation, The C.S. Mott Foundation, The Panta Rhea Foundation, The Nellie Mae Education Foundation, The California Endowment, The Hewlett Foundation, The Ruth Mott Foundation

Book Launch for Celina Su’s Landia featuring Youmna Chlala, Caroline Crumpacker, Paolo Javier, Cindi Katz, & Alissa Quart

Thu, Apr 26, 2018, 06:30 PM – 08:00 PM
The James Gallery

Join us for the book launch of Celina Su’s debut poetry collection Landia, which questions spatial practices, architecture and cities as they relate to language, the visual, and literature, featuring Caroline Crumpacker, Paolo Javier, Cindi Katz, Alissa Quart, and special guest Youmna Chlala, whose first collection The Paper Camera (Litmus Press) is forthcoming. Both Su and Chlala’s new books intersect with their artistic and academic practices in multiple ways along the lines of race, translation, movement, and displacement. In Landia (Belladonna* Series), Celina Su excavates literal and figurative borderlands—redrawn boundaries, architectural palimpsests, underground transport systems—to reckon with the historical and cultural forces that shape our cities and our intimate lives.

Co-sponsored by Belladonna* Series, Litmus Press, The James Gallery, Lost & Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative, the Gittell Collective, The Asian American Writers’ Workshop, and the Center for the Humanities at the Graduate Center, CUNY.