2019 CUNY Adjunct Incubator Projects

The Center for the Humanities’ CUNY Adjunct Incubator, co-sponsored by the Gittell Urban Studies Collective, is a framework for supporting the significant scholarly, creative, and pedagogical work of adjuncts teaching in the humanities and humanistic social sciences across CUNY. Providing social, logistical, financial, and professional support for the production and circulation of knowledge by CUNY adjuncts, this platform promotes the crucial work of part-time faculty across CUNY community and senior college campuses.

Learn more about the program here.

CUNY Adjunct Grant-Funded Projects & Scholarship

In 2018-19, the CUNY Adjunct Incubator awarded grants to 13 CUNY adjuncts from 6 CUNY colleges to develop a wide-range of deeply impactful public and applied projects in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. These projects range from addressing the needs and amplifying the successes of CUNY student-parents, to writing and performing new musical compositions for 3D-printed instruments, to photo-documentation of the erasure of Kurdish language from Kurdistan/Turkey, to food provision mapping that elucidates eating habits, access, and food inequities, and many more projects taking the form of concerts, dance, music, workshops, books, film, performance, classes, independent scholarship, and events. Read more about these grant-funded projects and the vital research and work by these outstanding CUNY adjuncts:

Enhancing CUNY-Wide Capacity to Promote the Success of Student-Parents

  • Emily Hotez (Psychology, Hunter College, CUNY)

This project seeks to develop institutional and pedagogical policies and practices aimed at better serving the needs of student-parents at CUNY. Click here for more information about this project.

Creating a Literary Commons: Engaging Students in Digital Archives

  • Aaron Botwick and Gabrielle Kappes (English, Lehman College, CUNY)

This project is designed to enable students to better grasp the relationships between literature, culture, and history by drawing connections between the digital archives of 8th- through 20th-century literature and aspects of the current digital communications revolution. Click here for more information about this project.

Innovating Technology In Art: Developing Contemporary Music for 3D-Printed Instruments

  • Harry Stafylakis (Music, City College of New York, CUNY)

This public research project is to create a new musical composition, Singularity, 2018, for 3D-printed string octet and orchestra. Click here for more information about this project. https://www.youtube.com/embed/xcLR6xwYpkA

Ethnography of Food Provisioning in Newark, NJ: Food Practices, Health Status, Social Identities, and Place of Residency

  • Angelika Winner (Earth Science and Geography, Lehman College/Hunter College, CUNY)

This project is an ethnographic study of food provisioning practices in Newark, NJ, seeking to develop an intersectional and dynamic understanding of food environments, eating habits, access, and their entanglements with food inequities. Click here for more information about this project.

The Right to the Image: Syrian Film Collective Abounaddara’s Emergency Cinema

  • Jason Fox (Film & Media, Hunter College, CUNY)

This project is a collection of essays that offers a critical introduction to the groundbreaking videos and activism of Abounaddara, the anonymous Syrian film collective, framing the ethical, political, and aesthetic insights of their work within the transformative effects of new digital technologies in war reporting and social justice campaigns. Click here for more information about this project.

g1(host): lostatsea

  • Nia Love (Drama, Theatre & Dance, Queens College, CUNY)

This project is an unfolding of the term “ghost,” which grapples with what it means to live within conditions shaped by the “afterlife” of slavery. This project will take the form of a four-part performance installation which is driven by this fundamental query: what remains of the Middle Passage as force, gesture, and affect? Click here for more information about this project.

Securitizing Resistance in Gafsa: Stratified Vulnerability and Surplus Labor Accumulation

  • Corinna Mullin (Political Science, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY)

This project builds upon the multi-method qualitative research she has conducted in Tunisia over the past six years on the colonial origins, architecture, and imperial imbrications of Tunisia’s security state. Click here for more information about this project.

Successful Lessons: Best Practices by Adjuncts in Literature & Composition/Rhetoric

  • Maria Grewe and Mark Alpert (English, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY)

This project is a three-part pedagogy workshop series led by composition/rhetoric and literature adjunct faculty in the English Department at John Jay College, CUNY to provide a forum for and foster collaboration between adjunct faculty. Click here for more information about this project.

The Musical Seeds Project: Intersections of Ecology, Music, and Dance

  • Pamela A. Proscia (Education, Hunter College, CUNY)

This project is a series of educational events that seek to expand the ways in which we think about growing and harvesting plant life through the perspectives of cross-cultural communities. Click here for more information about this project.

Bridging Mathematics and Computer Science

  • James Myer (Mathematics, Queens College, CUNY)

This project is a series of events and workshops bringing together faculty from the Mathematics and Computer Science departments at Queens College, CUNY to discuss interdisciplinary approaches to computer science and mathematics by putting them in conversation around mutual relevance. Click here for more information about this project.


The CUNY Adjunct Incubator Advisory Committee is comprised of: Ujju Aggarwal, Celina Su, Kendra Sullivan, and Mary N. Taylor.


The CUNY Adjunct Incubator is co-sponsored by the Center for the Humanities through generous grants from theSylvia Klatzkin Steinig Fund and the Gittell Urban Studies Collective at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

The CUNY Adjunct Incubator is co-sponsored by the Center for the Humanities and the Gittell Urban Studies Collective at the Graduate Center, CUNY. The Center for the Humanities thanks the Sylvia Klatzkin Steinig Fund for their generous support.

Book Talk: None of the Above

None of the Above: The Untold Story of the Atlanta Public Schools Cheating Scandal, Corporate Greed, and the Criminalization of Educators

Shani Robinson and Anna Simonton

February 13th 6 PM to 8 PM

Room 4202 at the CUNY Graduate Center

In None of the Above, Robinson and Simonton explore how racist policies and practices cheated generations of Black children out of opportunities long before some teachers tampered with tests. Examining the corporate education reform movement, hyper-policing in Black communities, cycles of displacement and gentrification, and widening racial and economic disparities in Atlanta, they reveal how the financially powerful have profited from privatization and the dismantling of public education. Against this backdrop, they cast the story of the cheating scandal in a new light, illuminating a deeply flawed investigation and a circus-like trial spun into a media sensation that defied justice.

Shani Robinson is an alumna of Tennessee State University and taught in Atlanta Public Schools for three years. She’s currently an advocate for trouble youth and their families.

Anna Simonton is an independent journalist and an editor for Scalawag magazine. Her work has been published by The Nation, In These Times, and AlterNet, among others.

Spring 2019 Public Science Project Book Series Events!

These events include:

2/13
None of the Above: The Untold Story of the Atlanta Public Schools Cheating Scandal, Corporate Greed, and the Criminalization of Educators
Shani Robinson and Anna Simonton
6-8 PM (Room 4202)

2/27
New York After 9/11
Editors: Susan Opotow and Zachary Baron Shemtob with contributors Diala Shamas and Charles Jennings6-8 PM (Room 6304.01)

3/04
Psycurity: Colonialism, Paranoia, and the War on Imagination
Rachal Liebert with Sonia Sanchez and Donald Brown
5-7 PM (Room 6304.01)

3/11 Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Trans and Were Afraid to Ask
Brynn Tannhill with Tanya Domi
5-7 PM (Room C198)

5/23 Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education
Michelle Fine (EP Faculty Member), Marc Spooner, Joel Westheimer, Sandy Grande
6-8 PM (Room 6304.01

FACULTY BOOK: SUSAN OPOTOW

New York After 9/11

(Empire State Editions, 2018)

Edited by Susan Opotow and Zachary Baron Shemtob

Contributor(s): Michael Arad, Michael Crane, Brian Davis, Ariel Durosky, Kimberly Flynn, Norman Groner, Lait Helpman, Anne Hilburn, Daniel Libeskind, Charles Jennings, Ari Lowell, Roberto Lucchini, Guillermina Mejia, Hirofumi Minami, Jacqueline Moline, Yuval Neria, Cristina Onea, Susan Opotow, David Prezant, Karyna Pryiomka, Joan Reibman, Diala Shamas, Zachary Baron Shemtob, Micki Siegel de Hernández, Patrick Sweeney and Xi Zhu

An estimated 2 billion people around the world watched the catastrophic destruction of the World Trade Center. The enormity of the moment was immediately understood and quickly took on global proportions. What has been less obvious is the effect on the locus of the attacks, New York City, not as a seat of political or economic power, but as a community; not in the days and weeks afterward, but over months and years. New York after 9/11 offers insightful and critical observations about the processes set in motion by September 11, 2001 in New York, and holds important lessons for the future.